My Autumn Vacation, October 12-20, 2011 in the George Washington National Forest

I've had to begin using thumbnail images in my websites since my Canon Rebel EOS T2i takes digital pics at 18 megapixels. When you click on the thumbnails, you'll see that the larger pics that pop up have been downsized as well, 18mp pics are just incredibly too big for websites. I decreased each one to 40% of the original size for ease of viewing/loading.

All photos here are copyright protected 2011 J.A. Delbridge

Shutter Speed: 1/45 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/6.7; Focal Length: 27mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
I love getting water reflections of the autumn colors

Shutter Speed: 8 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 25mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
All these waterfall pics are taken with an extended shutter opening time which causes an artistic blur of the water. I also favor the use of a large aperture number. A large aperture number equals a smaller opening (the numbers pertain to fractions). With a small aperture opening, less light comes in for exposure, therefore a longer shutter speed is necessary. The smaller the aperture opening, the more focal range a picture has. That means foreground objects are generally as sharply focused as the main objects in the picture

Shutter Speed: 6 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 32mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
A photographer is rewarded when taking pictures right at sunset or sunrise, or, my preference, during a rainy day when the sunlight is not harsh. The colors of the wet leaves are more vibrant and works well with the diffused natural gray light

Shutter Speed: 6 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 18mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
Another necessity when shooting water scenes is the use of a circular polarizer filter. This darkens the darker colors and creates the ability to adjust out sun/light reflections from the surfaces of the water--the same way UV protected sunglasses work reducing reflections. I use a CP filter on 90% of my shots.

Shutter Speed: 2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 27mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: 1.5 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/27; Focal Length: 27mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: .7 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/27; Focal Length: 27mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: 6 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 18mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: 10 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/27; Focal Length: 32mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: 1/90 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/8; Focal Length: 42mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
There is a major difference in this pic compared to the first pic, though it is of the same lake. There was a light drizzle rain and the fog coming through the mountains was quite a sight in this pic

Shutter Speed: 30 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/32; Focal Length: 39mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
These pics are harder to capture than it appears. On a rainy day, the rain drops or the wind constantly causes the plants in the foreground to move. When leaving the shutter open for 15 to 30 seconds, it is a minor miracle to not see a blur when looking at these plants

Shutter Speed: 20 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/27; Focal Length: 38mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: 1 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/4.5; Focal Length: 34mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: 2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 20mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
Sunrise seen from atop the Blue Ridge Parkway, near Afton Mountain

Shutter Speed: 2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/27; Focal Length: 34mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
I usually bracket my shots with about a 1 step underexposure and 1 step overexposure to ensure I get what I desire, thus creating 3 pics for each pic. This is especially true when taking pics of a sunrise or a sunset since the bright sun can cause havock on the exposures. The camera reads the bright light and underexposes the foreground often. Keeping this in mind, I can still usually get the exposure I want

Shutter Speed: 2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/16; Focal Length: 18mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
This shot was taken from the exact same spot as the above pic, but, behind where I had set up the tripod. I looked behind me and noticed the glowing colors of the trees from the low, orange light of the sunrise. Sometimes you just gotta turn around and there may be a surprise

Shutter Speed: 2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/16; Focal Length: 18mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
This was a windy, cold morning. I failed to note before my vacation the times of sunrise and sunset. I waited for almost an hour for the sun to appear in 40ish degree weather and gusty winds. Note the blur of the ferns in the left foreground. I tried this shot many times in hopes the wind would not blow the plants since I had to keep my shutter open for about 4-6 seconds. No luck. This pic had the least amount of blur

Shutter Speed: 2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/8; Focal Length: 21mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
Cabin at Humback Rocks on the Blue Ridge Parkway, near mile marker 5

Shutter Speed: 2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 18mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Converted to black and white 1 bit by photoshop

Shutter Speed: 2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/16; Focal Length: 23mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: 1.5 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/27; Focal Length: 29mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
This pic, and the one right below it, are of the same scene as the sunrise makes it over the eastern slope of the mountains

Shutter Speed: 1/6 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 24mm; ISO Speed ISO-100

Shutter Speed: 1/3 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 21mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
These last two pics are shot towards the west, with the eastern sunrise behind me. This is the Shenandoah Valley just south of Waynesboro, near Stuarts Draft, Va

Shutter Speed: 1/2 seconds; Lens Aperture: F/22; Focal Length: 18mm; ISO Speed ISO-100
My campsite in the George Washington Nat'l Forest near Sherando is down there somewhere



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Updated October 20, 2011


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